1. <mathematics> A member of a vector space.

2. <computer graphics> A line or movement defined by its end points, or by the current position and one other point. See vector graphics.

3. <operating system> A memory location containing the address of some code, often some kind of exception handler or other operating system service. By changing the vector to point to a different piece of code it is possible to modify the behaviour of the operating system.

Compare: hook.

4. <computer programming> A one-dimensional array.

(01 Feb 1996)

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1. <mathematics> A term to describe something that has both direction and magnitude.

2. <molecular biology> Commonly term for a plasmid that can be used to transfer DNA sequences from one organism to another. Different vectors may have properties particularly appropriate to give protein expression in the recipient or for cloning or may have different selectable markers.

Recombinant DNA systems especially suited for production of large quantities of specific proteins in bacterial, yeast, insect, or mammalian cell systems.

See: transfection.

(05 Mar 2000)

vdx, ve, vection, vectis, vector < Prev | Next > vector-borne, Vector C, vectorcardiogram

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