1. To place again; to restore to a former place, position, condition, or the like. "The earl . . . Was replaced in his government." (Bacon)

2. To refund; to repay; to restore; as, to replace a sum of money borrowed.

3. To supply or substitute an equivalent for; as, to replace a lost document. "With Israel, religion replaced morality." (M. Arnold)

4. To take the place of; to supply the want of; to fulfull the end or office of. "This duty of right intention does not replace or supersede the duty of consideration." (Whewell)

5. To put in a new or different place.

The propriety of the use of replace instead of displace, supersede, take the place of, as in the third and fourth definitions, is often disputed on account of etymological discrepancy; but the use has been sanctioned by the practice of careful writers.

<chemistry> Replaced crystal, a crystal having one or more planes in the place of its edges or angles.

Origin: Pref. Re- + place: cf. F. Replacer.

(01 Mar 1998)