1. To advise; to counsel. See Rede. "Therefore, I read thee, get to God's word, and thereby try all doctrine." (Tyndale)

2. To interpret; to explain; as, to read a riddle.

3. To tell; to declare; to recite. "But read how art thou named, and of what kin." (Spenser)

4. To go over, as characters or words, and utter aloud, or recite to one's self inaudibly; to take in the sense of, as of language, by interpreting the characters with which it is expressed; to peruse; as, to read a discourse; to read the letters of an alphabet; to read figures; to read the notes of music, or to read music; to read a book. "Redeth [read ye] the great poet of Itaille." (Chaucer) "Well could he rede a lesson or a story." (Chaucer)

5. Hence, to know fully; to comprehend. "Who is't can read a woman?" (Shak)

6. To discover or understand by characters, marks, features, etc.; to learn by observation. "An armed corse did lie, In whose dead face he read great magnanimity." (Spenser) "Those about her From her shall read the perfect ways of honor." (Shak)

7. To make a special study of, as by perusing textbooks; as, to read theology or law. To read one's self in, to read about the Thirty-nine Articles and the Declaration of Assent, required of a clergyman of the Church of England when he first officiates in a new benefice.

Origin: OE. Reden, raeden, AS. Raedan to read, advice, counsel, fr. Raed advise, counsel, raedan (imperf. Reord) to advice, counsel, guess; akin to D. Raden to advise, G. Raten, rathen, Icel. Ratha, Goth. Redan (in comp), and perh. Also to Skr. Radh to succeed. Cf. Riddle.

1. Saying; sentence; maxim; hence, word; advice; counsel. See Rede.

2. [Read] Reading. "One newswoman here lets magazines for a penny a read." (Furnivall)

Origin: AS. Raed counsel, fr. Raedan to counsel. See Read.

(01 Mar 1998)