Referring to the coccyx.

(05 Mar 2000)

<anatomy> The part of the scapula behind or below the spine, or mesoscapula.

Origin: NL. See Post-, and Scapula.

(01 Mar 1998)

postscapularmedical dictionary

<anatomy> Of or pertaining to the postscapula; infraspinous.

(01 Mar 1998)

postrolandic, postrubella syndrome, postsacral, postscapula < Prev | Next > postscarlatinal, PostScript, postscript

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postscarlatinalmedical dictionary

Occurring as a sequel to scarlatina.

(05 Mar 2000)

<programming language>

<text, computer graphics> A page description language based on work originally done by John Gaffney at Evans and Sutherland in 1976, evolving through "JaM" ("John and Martin", Martin Newell) at XEROX PARC, and finally implemented in its current form by John Warnock et al. after he and Chuck Geschke founded Adobe Systems, Inc. in 1982.

PostScript is an interpreted, stack-based language (like FORTH). It was used as a page description language by the Apple LaserWriter, and now many laser printers and on-screen graphics systems. Its primary application is to describe the appearance of text, graphical shapes, and sampled images on printed or displayed pages.

A program in PostScript can communicate a document description from a composition system to a printing system in a device-independent way.

PostScript is an unusually powerful printer language because it is a full programming language, rather than a series of low-level escape sequences. (In this it parallels Emacs, which exploited a similar insight about editing tasks). It is also noteworthy for implementing on-the fly rasterisation, from Bezier curve descriptions, of high-quality fonts at low (e.g. 300 dpi) resolution (it was formerly believed that hand-tuned bitmap fonts were required for this task).

PostScript's combination of technical merits and widespread availability made it the language of choice for graphical output until PDF appeared.

The Postscript point, 1/72 inch, is slightly different from other point units.

An introduction.

["PostScript Language Reference Manual" ("The Red Book"), Adobe Systems, A-W 1985].

(01 Jul 2002)

postsacral, postscapula, postscapular, postscarlatinal < Prev | Next > postscript, Postscript point, postscutellum

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A paragraph added to a letter after it is concluded and signed by the writer; an addition made to a book or composition after the main body of the work has been finished, containing something omitted, or something new occurring to the writer. [Abbrev. P. S.

Origin: L. Postscriptus, (assumed) p. P. Of postscribere to write after; post after + scribere to write: cf. F. Postscriptum. See Post-, and Scribe.

(01 Mar 1998)

postscapula, postscapular, postscarlatinal, PostScript < Prev | Next > Postscript point, postscutellum

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Postscript pointcomputing dictionary

<unit, text> The variant of the point used by Postscript, equal to 0.3527777778 mm, or 1/72 inch.

(01 Jul 2002)

postscutellummedical dictionary

<zoology> The hindermost dorsal piece of a thoracic somite of an insect; the plate behind the scutellum.

Origin: NL. See Post-, and Scutellum.

(01 Mar 1998)

postscarlatinal, PostScript, postscript, Postscript point < Prev | Next > postsecondary award, postsphenoid

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postsecondary awardeducation dictionary

<qualification>

A certificate, or diploma that includes the following definitions for postsecondary awards, certificates, and diplomas of varying durations and credit/contact hour requirements:

Less Than 1 Academic Year

Requires completion of an organized programme of study at the postsecondary level (below the baccalaureate degree) in less than 1 academic year (2 semesters or 3 quarters) or in less than 900 contact hours by a student enrolled full-time.

At Least 1 But Less Than 2 Academic Years

Requires completion of an organized programme of study at the postsecondary level (below the baccalaureate degree) in at least 1 but less than 2 full-time equivalent academic years, or designed for completion in at least 30 but less than 60 credit hours, or in at least 900 but less than 1,800 contact hours.

At Least 2 But Less Than 4 Academic Years

Requires completion of an organized programme of study at the postsecondary level (below the baccalaureate degree) in at least 2 but less than 4 full-time equivalent academic years, or designed for completion in at least 40 but less than 120 credit hours, or in at least 1,800 but less than 3,600 contact hours.

(14 Jan 2009)

postsphenoidmedical dictionary

<anatomy> Of or pertaining to the posterior part of the sphenoid bone.

Origin: Pref. Post- + sphenoid.

(01 Mar 1998)

postsphenoid bonemedical dictionary

The posterior portion of the body of the sphenoid bone.

(05 Mar 2000)

postsphygmicmedical dictionary

Occurring after the pulse wave.

Origin: G. Sphygmos, pulse

(05 Mar 2000)

Posterior to the spleen.

(05 Mar 2000)

poststationary phasemedical dictionary

The period in the growth of a bacterial culture in which growth is declining.

(05 Mar 2000)

post-steady statemedical dictionary

Any period of time, particularly in an enzyme-catalyzed reaction, after the steady-state interval; e.g., when the rate of product formation is declining in an enzyme-catalyzed reaction.

(05 Mar 2000)

post-stenotic dilationmedical dictionary

Dilation of an artery, most commonly the pulmonary artery or the aorta, distal to an area of narrowing.

(05 Mar 2000)

poststeroid panniculitismedical dictionary
postsulcal part of tonguemedical dictionary

Preferred term: dorsum of tongue

postsynapticmedical dictionary

Pertaining to the area on the distal side of a synaptic cleft.

(05 Mar 2000)

postsynaptic cellmedical dictionary

In a chemical synapse, the cell that receives a signal (binds neurotransmitter) from the presynaptic cell and responds with depolarisation In an electrical synapse, the postsynaptic cell would just be downstream, but since many electrical synapses are rectifying, one of the two cells involved will always be postsynaptic.

(11 Mar 2008)

postsynaptic membranemedical dictionary

That part of the plasma membrane of a neurone or muscle fibre with which an axon terminal forms a synaptic junction; in many instances, at least part of such a small postsynaptic membrane patch shows characteristic morphological modifications such as greater thickness and higher electron-density, believed to correspond to the transmitter-sensitive receptor site of such synapses.

(05 Mar 2000)

postsynaptic potentialmedical dictionary

In a synapse, a change in the resting potential of a postsynaptic cell following stimulation of the presynaptic cell. For example: in a cholinergic synapse, the release of acetylcholine from the presynaptic cell causes channels to open in the postsynaptic cell. Each channel opening causes a small depolarisation, known as a miniature end plate potential (mepp), these sum to produce an excitatory postsynaptic potential.

(11 Mar 2008)

postsynaptic, postsynaptic cell, postsynaptic membrane < Prev | Next > posttarsal, posttecta

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