1. To set or put on shore from a ship or other water craft; to disembark; to debark. "I 'll undertake top land them on our coast." (Shak)

2. To catch and bring to shore; to capture; as, to land a fish.

3. To set down after conveying; to cause to fall, alight, or reach; to bring to the end of a course; as, he landed the quoit near the stake; to be thrown from a horse and landed in the mud; to land one in difficulties or mistakes.

Origin: Landed; Landing.

1. The solid part of the surface of the earth; opposed to water as constituting a part of such surface, especially to oceans and seas; as, to sight land after a long voyage. "They turn their heads to sea, their sterns to land." (Dryden)

2. Any portion, large or small, of the surface of the earth, considered by itself, or as belonging to an individual or a people, as a country, estate, farm, or tract. "Go view the land, even Jericho." (Josh. Ii. 1) "Ill fares the land, to hastening ills a prey, Where wealth accumulates and men decay." (Goldsmith) See also, Goldsmith: Where wealth and freedom reign contentment fails, And honor sinks where commerce long prevails. (THe captivity, an Oratorio. Act II line 91)

In the expressions "to be, or dwell, upon land," "to go, or fare, on land," as used by Chaucer, land denotes the country as distinguished from the town. "A poor parson dwelling upon land [i.e, in the country]" (Chaucer)

3. Ground, in respect to its nature or quality; soil; as, wet land; good or bad land.

4. The inhabitants of a nation or people. "These answers, in the silent night received, The kind himself divulged, the land believed." (Dryden)

5. The mainland, in distinction from islands.

6. The ground or floor. "Herself upon the land she did prostrate." (Spenser)

7. <agriculture> The ground left unplowed between furrows; any one of several portions into which a field is divided for convenience in plowing.

8. Any ground, soil, or earth whatsoever, as meadows, pastures, woods, etc, and everything annexed to it, whether by nature, as trees, water, etc, or by the hand of man, as buildings, fences, etc.; real estate.

9. The lap of the strakes in a clinker-built boat; the lap of plates in an iron vessel; called also landing.

10. In any surface prepared with indentations, perforations, or grooves, that part of the surface which is not so treated, as the level part of a millstone between the furrows, or the surface of the bore of a rifled gun between the grooves. Land agent, a person employed to sell or let land, to collect rents, and to attend to other money matters connected with land. Land boat, a vehicle on wheels propelled by sails. Land blink, a peculiar atmospheric brightness seen from sea over distant snow-covered land in arctic regions. See Ice blink. Land breeze. See Breeze. Land chain. See Gunter's chain. Land crab, to sight land. To set the land, to see by the compass how the land bears from the ship. To shut in the land, to hide the land, as when fog, or an intervening island, obstructs the view.

Origin: AS. Land, lond; akin to D, G, Icel, Sw, Dan, and Goth. Land.

(01 Mar 1998)

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