1. To unite by a joint or joints; to fit together; to prepare so as to fit together; as, to joint boards. "Pierced through the yielding planks of jointed wood." (Pope)

2. To join; to connect; to unite; to combine. "Jointing their force 'gainst Caesar." (Shak)

3. To provide with a joint or joints; to articulate. "The fingers are jointed together for motion." (Ray)

4. To separate the joints; of; to divide at the joint or joints; to disjoint; to cut up into joints, as meat. "He joints the neck. "Quartering, jointing, seething, and roasting." (Holland)

Origin: Jointed; Jointing.

1. The place or part where two things or parts are joined or united; the union of two or more smooth or even surfaces admitting of a close-fitting or junction; junction as, a joint between two pieces of timber; a joint in a pipe.

2. A joining of two things or parts so as to admit of motion; an articulation, whether movable or not; a hinge; as, the knee joint; a node or joint of a stem; a ball and socket joint. See Articulation. "A scaly gauntlet now, with joints of steel, Must glove this hand." (Shak) "To tear thee joint by joint." (Milton)

3. The part or space included between two joints, knots, nodes, or articulations; as, a joint of cane or of a grass stem; a joint of the leg.

4. Any one of the large pieces of meat, as cut into portions by the butcher for roasting.

5. <geology> A plane of fracture, or divisional plane, of a rock transverse to the stratification.

6. The space between the adjacent surfaces of two bodies joined and held together, as by means of cement, mortar, etc.; as, a thin joint.

7. The means whereby the meeting surfaces of pieces in a structure are secured together. Coursing joint, the chair that supports the ends of abutting rails. Joint coupling, a universal joint for coupling shafting. See Universal. Joint hinge, a hinge having long leaves; a strap hinge. Joint splice, a reenforce at a joint, to sustain the parts in their true relation. Joint stool. A stool consisting of jointed parts; a folding stool. A block for supporting the end of a piece at a joint; a joint chair. Out of joint, out of place; dislocated, as when the head of a bone slips from its socket; hence, not working well together; disordered. "The time is out of joint."

Origin: F. Joint, fr. Joindre, p. P. Joint. See Join.

(01 Mar 1998)

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