In a direction toward the base of any object or structure.

(05 Mar 2000)

barytes, baryto-, baryto-calcite, barytum < Prev | Next > basal, basal age, basal anaesthesia

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Pertaining to or situated near a base.

This entry appears with permission from the Dictionary of Cell and Molecular Biology

(11 Mar 2008)

baryto-, baryto-calcite, barytum, basad < Prev | Next > basal age, basal anaesthesia, basal area

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The highest mental age level of the Stanford-Binet intelligence scale at which all items are passed.

(05 Mar 2000)

baryto-calcite, barytum, basad, basal < Prev | Next > basal anaesthesia, basal area, basal body

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basal anaesthesiamedical dictionary

Parenteral administration of one or more sedatives to produce a state of depressed consciousness short of a general anaesthesia.

American spelling: basal anesthesia

(05 Mar 2000)

baryto-calcite, barytum, basad, basal, basal age < Prev | Next > basal area, basal body, basal body temperature

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<botany> The cross-sectional area of a tree trunk measured in square inches, square centimetres, etc., basal area is normally measured at 4.5 feet above ground level and is used as a measure of dominance, the most commonly used tool for measuring basal area is a diameter tape or a D-tape (then convert to basal area).

(09 Oct 1997)

basad, basal, basal age, basal anaesthesia < Prev | Next > basal body, basal body temperature, basal bone

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<cell biology> Structure found at the base of eukaryotic cilia and flagella consisting of a continuation of the nine outer sets of axonemal microtubules but with the addition of a C tubule to form a triplet (like the centriole).

May be self replicating and serves as a nucleating centre for axonemal assembly. Anchored in the cytoplasm by rootlets. Synonymous with kinetosome.

This entry appears with permission from the Dictionary of Cell and Molecular Biology

(11 Mar 2008)

basal, basal age, basal anaesthesia, basal area < Prev | Next > basal body temperature, basal bone, basal cell

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basal body temperaturemedical dictionary

<biology> The temperature taken at its lowest point in the day, usually in the morning before getting out of bed.

(09 Oct 1997)

basal age, basal anaesthesia, basal area, basal body < Prev | Next > basal bone, basal cell, basal cell adenoma

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The osseus tissue of the mandible and maxillae except the alveolar processes.

(05 Mar 2000)

<pathology> General term for relatively undifferentiated cells in an epithelial sheet that give rise to more specialised cells act as stem cells).

In the stratified squamous epithelium of mammalian skin the basal cells of the epidermis (stratum basale) give rise by an unequal division to another basal cell and to cells that progress through the spinous, granular and horny layers, becoming progressively more keratinised, the outermost being shed as squames.

In olfactory mucosa the basal cells give rise to olfactory and sustentacular cells.

In the epithelium of epididymis their function is unclear, but they probably serve as stem cells.

(13 Nov 1997)

basal cell adenomamedical dictionary

<tumour>

A benign tumour of major or minor salivary glands or other organs composed of small cells showing peripheral palisading.

(05 Mar 2000)

basal cell carcinomamedical dictionary

<tumour>

<oncology> The most common form of skin cancer.

A malignant growth of epidermal tissue, specifically basal cells. most common in the fair-skinned on sun-exposed areas (especially the face).

(15 Nov 1997)

basal cell epitheliomamedical dictionary

Preferred term: basal cell carcinoma

basal cell hyperplasiamedical dictionary

Increase in the number of cells in an epithelium resembling the basal cells.

(05 Mar 2000)

basal cell layermedical dictionary

Preferred term: stratum basale epidermidis

basal cell nevusmedical dictionary

A hereditary disease noted in infancy or adolescence, characterised by lesions of the eyelids, nose, cheeks, neck, and axillae, appearing as uneroded flesh-coloured papules, some becoming pedunculated, and histologically indistinguishable from basal cell epithelioma; also noted are punctate keratotic lesions of the palms and soles; the lesions usually remain benign, but in some cases ulceration and invasion occur and are evidence of malignant change; autosomal dominant inheritance.

(05 Mar 2000)

basal cell nevus syndromemedical dictionary

<syndrome>

An inherited group of defects which involve abnormalities of the skin, eyes, nervous system, endocrine, glands and bones.

The condition is characterised by an unusual facial appearance and a predisposition for skin cancer.

(27 Sep 1997)

basal cell papillomamedical dictionary

Preferred term: seborrhoeic keratosis

Small, round cells found in the lower part, or base, of the epidermis, the outer layer of the skin.

(12 Dec 1998)

basal cisternmedical dictionary

Preferred term: interpeduncular cistern

basal corpusclemedical dictionary

Preferred term: basal body

A diet having a caloric value equal to the basal heat production and sufficient quanties of essential nutrients to meet basic needs, in experiments in nutrition, a diet from which a given constituent (e.g., a vitamin, mineral, or amino acid), the nutritional value of which is to be determined, is omitted for a period and the effects observed; the subject is observed for a second period during which the ingredient being studied is added to the diet.

(05 Mar 2000)

basal gangliamedical dictionary

<anatomy> Three large subcortical nuclei of the vertebrate brain: the putamen, the caudate nucleus and the globus pallidus.

They participate in the control of movement along with the cerebellum, the corticospinal system and other descending motor systems. Lesions of the basal ganglia occur in a variety of motor disorders including Parkinson's disease and Huntingdon's chorea.

(15 Nov 1997)

basal ganglia calcificationmedical dictionary

basal cistern, basal corpuscle, basal diet, basal ganglia < Prev | Next > basal gland, basal granule, basalioma

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Preferred term: hypophysis

basal diet, basal ganglia, basal ganglia calcification < Prev | Next > basal granule, basalioma, basalis

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basal granulemedical dictionary

Preferred term: basal body

basal ganglia, basal ganglia calcification, basal gland < Prev | Next > basalioma, basalis, basal joint reflex

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<tumour>

Obsolete term for basal cell carcinoma.

(05 Mar 2000)

Synonyms: basal.

Origin: L.

(05 Mar 2000)

basal joint reflexmedical dictionary

Opposition and adduction of the thumb with flexion at its metacarpophalangeal joint and extension at its interphalangeal joint, when firm passive flexion of the third, fourth, or fifth finger is made; the reflex is present normally but is absent in pyramidal lesions.

Synonyms: finger-thumb reflex, Mayer's reflex.

(05 Mar 2000)

basal gland, basal granule, basalioma, basalis < Prev | Next > basal lamina, basal lamina of choroid

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basal laminamedical dictionary

Preferred term: basement membrane

basal lamina of choroidmedical dictionary

Preferred term: lamina basalis choroideae

basal lamina of ciliary bodymedical dictionary

The inner layer of the ciliary body, continuous with the basal layer of the choroid and supporting the pigment epithelium of the ciliary retina.

Synonyms: lamina basalis corporis ciliaris, basal layer of ciliary body.

(05 Mar 2000)

basal lamina of cochlearmedical dictionary

Preferred term: basilar membrane

basal lamina of neural tubemedical dictionary
basal lamina of semicircular ductmedical dictionary

Preferred term: stratum basale

basal layer of choroidmedical dictionary

Preferred term: lamina basalis choroideae

basal layer of ciliary bodymedical dictionary
basal mediummedical dictionary

<cell culture> An unsupplemented medium which promotes the growth of many types of microorganisms which do not require any special nutrient supplements.

(15 Nov 1997)

basal membrane of semicircular ductmedical dictionary
basal metabolic ratemedical dictionary

<biochemistry, biology> The metabolic rate as measured under basal conditions: 12 hours after eating, after a restful sleep, no exercise or activity preceding test, elimination of emotional excitement and occurring in a comfortable temperature.

Acronym: BMR

(15 Nov 1997)

basal metabolismmedical dictionary

<biochemistry, biology> Heat production, or its measurement, of an organism at the lowest level of cell chemistry in an inactive, awake, fasting state.

It may be determined directly by means of a calorimeter or indirectly by calculating the heat production from an analysis of the end products of oxidation within the organism or from the amount of oxygen utilised.

(27 Jun 1999)

basal-nervedmedical dictionary

<botany> Having the nerves radiating from the base; said of leaves.

(01 Mar 1998)

basal nucleimedical dictionary

Nucleus of the cerebral hemisphere that originally included the caudate and lenticular nuclei, the claustrum and the amygdaloid body (complex); functionally the term basal nuclei now specifies the caudate and lenticular nuclei and adjacent cell groups having important connections therewith (subthalamic nucleus; substantia nigra, partes compacta and reticulata); amygdaloid complex now known to be part of the limbic system.

Synonyms: nuclei basales.

(05 Mar 2000)

basal metabolic rate, basal metabolism, basal-nerved < Prev | Next > basal nucleus of Ganser, basaloid

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basal nucleus of Gansermedical dictionary

A large group of large cells in the innominate substance, ventral to the lentiform nucleus.

Synonyms: nucleus basalis of Ganser.

(05 Mar 2000)

Resembling that which is basal, but not necessarily basal in origin or position.

(05 Mar 2000)

basaloid carcinomamedical dictionary

<tumour>

A poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma of the anus that has some microscopic resemblance to basal cell carcinoma of the skin, but which frequently metastasizes.

(05 Mar 2000)

basal-nerved, basal nuclei, basal nucleus of Ganser, basaloid < Prev | Next > basaloid cell, basaloma

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basaloid cellmedical dictionary

A cell, usually of the epidermis, resembling a basal cell.

(05 Mar 2000)

<tumour>

Obsolete term for basal cell carcinoma.

(05 Mar 2000)

basal part of occipital bonemedical dictionary
basal part of pulmonary arterymedical dictionary
basal plate of neural tubemedical dictionary

Preferred term: basal lamina of neural tube

basal rationmedical dictionary

Minimal diet containing only essential components.

(05 Mar 2000)

Preferred term: alveolar process

Preferred term: costa

Preferred term: denture foundation area

basal seat areamedical dictionary

That portion of the oral structures which is available to support a denture.

(05 Mar 2000)

basal ration, basal ridge, basal rod, basal seat < Prev | Next > basal skull fracture, basal sphincter

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basal skull fracturemedical dictionary

<orthopaedics> A fracture involving the base of the cranium.

This fracture is often difficult to detect clinically. Findings may include raccoon eyes, Battle's sign, haemotympanum and cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhoea.

Plain skull X-ray will often not reveal the basal skull fracture, making a CT scan or MRI the most reliable diagnostic investigation.

(15 Nov 1997)

basal sphinctermedical dictionary

The thickening of the circular muscular coat at the base of the ileal papilla at the terminal ileum.

Synonyms: sphincteroid tract of ileum.

(05 Mar 2000)

basal squamous cell carcinomamedical dictionary

Preferred term: basosquamous carcinoma

basal seat area, basal skull fracture, basal sphincter < Prev | Next > basal striations, basal surface, basalt

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basal striationsmedical dictionary

The vertical infranuclear striation's due to the infolded plasma membrane and mitochondria; they are seen in kidney tubules and certain intralobular salivary ducts.

(05 Mar 2000)

basal surfacemedical dictionary

The surface of the denture of which the detail is determined by the impression and which rests upon the basal seat.

(05 Mar 2000)

1. <geology> A rock of igneous origin, consisting of augite and triclinic feldspar, with grains of magnetic or titanic iron, and also bottle-green particles of olivine frequently disseminated.

It is usually of a greenish black colour, or of some dull brown shade, or black. It constitutes immense beds in some regions, and also occurs in veins or dikes cutting through other rocks. It has often a prismatic structure as at the Giant's Causeway, in Ireland, where the columns are as regular as if the work of art. It is a very tough and heavy rock, and is one of the best materials for macadamizing roads.

2. An imitation, in pottery, of natural basalt; a kind of black porcelain.

Origin: N. Basaltes (an African word), a dark and hard species of marble found in Ethiopia: cf. F. Basalte.

(01 Mar 1998)

basal tentorial branch of internal carotid arterymedical dictionary
basal tuberculosismedical dictionary

Tuberculosis of the basilar portions of the lungs.

(05 Mar 2000)

basal vein of Rosenthalmedical dictionary

A large vein passing caudally and dorsally along the medial surface of the temporal lobe from which it receives tributaries; it empties into the great cerebral vein (of Galen) from the lateral side.

Synonyms: vena basalis, Rosenthal's vein.

(05 Mar 2000)

<chemical>

Lydian stone, or black jasper, a variety of siliceous or flinty slate, of a grayish or bluish black colour. It is employed to test the purity of gold, the amount of alloy being indicated by the colour left on the stone when rubbed by the metal.

Origin: L. Basanites lapis, Gr. The touchstone: cf. F. Basanite.

(01 Mar 1998)

<person>

A 20th century German physician.

See: Basan's syndrome.

(05 Mar 2000)

Basan's syndromemedical dictionary

basal vein of Rosenthal, basal veins, basanite, Basan, Mariane < Prev | Next > basbleu, bascule, base, base 64

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A bluestocking; a literary woman.

Origin: F, fr. Bas stocking + bleu blue.

(01 Mar 1998)

basal veins, basanite, Basan, Mariane, Basan's syndrome < Prev | Next > bascule, base, base 64, base analogue

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In mechanics an apparatus on the principle of the seesaw, in which one end rises as the other falls. Bascule bridge, a counterpoise or balanced drawbridge, which is opened by sinking the counterpoise and thus lifting the footway into the air.

Origin: F, a seesaw.

(01 Mar 1998)

basanite, Basan, Mariane, Basan's syndrome, basbleu < Prev | Next > base, base 64, base analogue

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<chemistry> The nonacid part of a salt, a substance that combines with acids to form salts, a substance that dissociates to give hydroxide ions in aqueous solutions, a substance whose molecule or ion can combine with a proton (hydrogen ion), a substance capable of donating a pair of electrons (to an acid) for the formation of a coordinate covalent bond.

(13 Nov 1997)

Basan, Mariane, Basan's syndrome, basbleu, bascule < Prev | Next > base 64, base analogue, baseball

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<file format> A file format using 64 ASCII characters to encode the six bit binary data values 0-63.

To convert data to base 64, the first byte is placed in the most significant eight bits of a 24-bit buffer, the next in the middle eight, and the third in the least significant eight bits. If there a fewer than three bytes to encode, the corresponding buffer bits will be zero. The buffer is then used, six bits at a time, most significant first, as indices into the string "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz0123456789+/" and the indicated character output. If there were only one or two input bytes, the output is padded with two or one "=" characters respectively. This prevents extra bits being added to the reconstructed data. The process then repeats on the remaining input data.

Base 64 is used when transmitting binary data through text-only media such as electronic mail, and has largely replaced the older uuencode encoding.

(01 Sep 2004)

Basan's syndrome, basbleu, bascule, base < Prev | Next > base analogue, baseball, baseball coil

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base analoguemedical dictionary

<biochemistry> A chemical which resembles a nucleotide base. They can substitute the Purine and pyrimidine bases that normally appear in DNA, despite minor differences in structure. May be used for inducing mutations, including point mutations.

For example: 5 bromouracil can replace thymine or 2 aminopurine replace adenine.

American spelling: base analog

(13 Nov 1997)

Basan's syndrome, basbleu, bascule, base, base 64 < Prev | Next > baseball, baseball coil, baseball elbow

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A competitive nine-member team sport including softball.

(12 Dec 1998)

bascule, base, base 64, base analogue < Prev | Next > baseball coil, baseball elbow, baseball finger

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baseball coilmedical dictionary

<radiobiology> Used in magnetic-mirror geometries to produce a minimum-B configuration, so-called because of their resemblance to the characteristic shape of stitches on a baseball.

(09 Oct 1997)

base, base 64, base analogue, baseball < Prev | Next > baseball elbow, baseball finger, baseband

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baseball elbowmedical dictionary

An epicondylitis of the medial epicondyle at the origin of the flexor muscles of the forearm; related to throwing and usually seen in children or adolescents.

(05 Mar 2000)

base 64, base analogue, baseball, baseball coil < Prev | Next > baseball finger, baseband, baseboard

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baseball fingermedical dictionary

An avulsion, partial or complete, of the long finger extensor from the base of the distal phalanx.

Synonyms: drop finger, hammer finger, mallet finger.

(05 Mar 2000)

base analogue, baseball, baseball coil, baseball elbow < Prev | Next > baseband, baseboard, baseborn

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A transmission medium through which digital signals are sent without frequency shifting. In general, only one communication channel is available at any given time.

Ethernet is an example of a baseband network.

See also: broadband.

(01 Feb 1995)

baseball, baseball coil, baseball elbow, baseball finger < Prev | Next > baseboard, baseborn, base class

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A board, or other woodwork, carried round the walls of a room and touching the floor, to form a base and protect the plastering; also called washboard (in England), mopboard, and scrubboard.

(01 Mar 1998)

baseball coil, baseball elbow, baseball finger, baseband < Prev | Next > baseborn, base class, base composition

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1. Born out of wedlock.

2. Born of low parentage.

3. Vile; mean. "Thy baseborn heart."

(01 Mar 1998)

baseball elbow, baseball finger, baseband, baseboard < Prev | Next > base class, base composition, base deficit

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<computer programming> (Or "superclass") The class from which another class (a "subclass") inherits, the class it is based on.

"base class" is the term used in C++. The objects of the superclass are a superset of the objects of the subclass.

See inheritance.

(01 Sep 2004)

baseball finger, baseband, baseboard, baseborn < Prev | Next > base composition, base deficit

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base compositionmedical dictionary

<biochemistry> In reference to nucleic acid, the proportion of the total bases consisting of guanine plus cytosine or thymine plus adenine base pairs.

Usually expressed as a guanine + cytosine (G+C) value, for example 60% G+C.

(09 Oct 1997)

baseband, baseboard, baseborn, base class < Prev | Next > base deficit, base dissociation constant, basedoid

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base deficitmedical dictionary

baseboard, baseborn, base class, base composition < Prev | Next > base dissociation constant, basedoid, basedowian

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base dissociation constantmedical dictionary

<chemistry> This is the equilibrium constant for the reaction in which a weak base breaks apart in water to form its conjugate acid and hydroxide ion.

(09 Oct 1997)

baseborn, base class, base composition, base deficit < Prev | Next > basedoid, basedowian, Basedow, Karl von

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Rarely used term denoting a condition resembling Graves' disease (Basedow's disease), but without toxic symptoms.

(05 Mar 2000)

base composition, base deficit, base dissociation constant < Prev | Next > basedowian, Basedow, Karl von

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Rarely used to denote terms described by or attributed to K. Basedow.

(05 Mar 2000)

base deficit, base dissociation constant, basedoid < Prev | Next > Basedow, Karl von, Basedow's disease

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Basedow, Karl vonbiographical dictionary
Basedow's diseasemedical dictionary

<endocrinology> A common cause of hyperthyroidism thought to be caused by an underlying autoimmune mechanism.

(27 Sep 1997)

Basedow's goitremedical dictionary

Colloid goitre which becomes hyperfunctional after the ingestion of excess iodine, the Jod-Basedow phenomenon.

American spelling: Basedow's goiter

(05 Mar 2000)

basedowian, Basedow, Karl von, Basedow's disease < Prev | Next > Basedow's pseudoparaplegia, base excess

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Basedow's pseudoparaplegiamedical dictionary

Weakness of the thigh muscles in thyrotoxicosis; may occur suddenly and cause the patient to fall.

(05 Mar 2000)

Basedow, Karl von, Basedow's disease, Basedow's goitre < Prev | Next > base excess, base hospital, base in DNA

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A measure of metabolic alkalosis, usually predicted from the Siggaard-Andersen nomogram; the amount of strong acid that would have to be added per unit volume of whole blood to titrate it to pH 7.4 while at 37C and at a carbon dioxide pressure of 40 mm Hg.

(05 Mar 2000)

base hospitalmedical dictionary

A hospital unit located in a military or recreational encampment; usually of small size and limited facilities, for immediate care of illnesses and injuries.

Synonyms: camp hospital.

(05 Mar 2000)

Basedow's goitre, Basedow's pseudoparaplegia, base excess < Prev | Next > base in DNA, baseless, baseline

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A unit of the DNA. There are 4 bases: adenine (A), guanine (G), thymine (T), and cytosine (C). The sequence of bases (for example, CAG) is the genetic code.

(12 Dec 1998)

Basedow's pseudoparaplegia, base excess, base hospital < Prev | Next > baseless, baseline, baseline

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Without a base; having no foundation or support. "The baseless fabric of this vision."

(01 Mar 1998)

Basedow's pseudoparaplegia, base excess, base hospital, base in DNA < Prev | Next > baseline, baseline, baseline

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Preferred term: released version

base excess, base hospital, base in DNA, baseless < Prev | Next > baseline, baseline, baseline foetal heart rate

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The condition or situation prior to an intervention.

(14 Jan 2009)

base hospital, base in DNA, baseless, baseline < Prev | Next > baseline, baseline foetal heart rate, baseline test

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<anatomy> A line approximating the base of the skull, passing from the infraorbital ridge to the midline of the occiput, intersecting the superior margin of the external auditory meatus; the skull is in the anatomical position when the base line lies in the horizontal plane.

Synonyms: orbitomeatal line.

(08 Mar 2000)

base in DNA, baseless, baseline, baseline < Prev | Next > baseline foetal heart rate, baseline test

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baseline foetal heart ratemedical dictionary

baseless, baseline, baseline, baseline < Prev | Next > baseline test, baseline tonus

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baseline testmedical dictionary

<investigation>

Test which measures an organs normal level of functioning. Used to determine if any changes in organ function occur following treatment.

(16 Dec 1997)

baseline tonusmedical dictionary

Intrauterine pressure between contractions during labour.

(05 Mar 2000)

baseline variability of foetal heart ratemedical dictionary

The beat-to-beat changes in foetal heart rate as recorded on a graph.

(05 Mar 2000)

baseload capacitymedical dictionary

The power output that generating equipment can continuously produce.

(05 Dec 1998)

baseload demandmedical dictionary

The minimum demand experienced by an electric utility, usually 30-40% of the utility's peak demand.

(05 Dec 1998)

base materialmedical dictionary

Any substance from which a denture base may be made, such as shellac, acrylic resin, vulcanite, polystyrene, metal, etc.

(05 Mar 2000)

<computer hardware, jargon> The lowest 640 kilobytes of memory in an IBM PC-compatible computer running MS-DOS. Other PC operating systems can usually compensate and "ignore" the fact that there is a 640K limit to base memory. This was put in place because the original CPU - the Intel 8088 - could only access one megabyte of memory, and IBM wanted to reserve the upper 384KB for device drivers. The high memory area (HMA) lies above 640KB and can be accessed on MS-DOS computers that have an A20 handler.

(01 Mar 1997)

baseload capacity, baseload demand, base material < Prev | Next > basement, basement lamina, basement membrane

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The outer wall of the ground story of a building, or of a part of that story, when treated as a distinct substructure. (See Base, 3) Hence: The rooms of a ground floor, collectively.

<anatomy> Basement membrane, a delicate membrane composed of a single layer of flat cells, forming the substratum upon which, in many organs, the epithelioid cells are disposed.

Origin: F. Soubassement. Of uncertain origin. Cf. Base, Bastion.

(01 Mar 1998)

basement laminamedical dictionary

Preferred term: basement membrane

basement membranemedical dictionary

<cell biology> Extracellular matrix characteristically found under epithelial cells.

There are two distinct layers: the basal lamina, immediately adjacent to the cells, is a product of the epithelial cells themselves and contains collagen type IV and the reticular lamina is produced by fibroblasts of the underlying connective tissue and contains fibrillar collagen.

(15 Nov 1997)

base material, base memory, basement, basement lamina < Prev | Next > base metal, base microscopical, basename

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A metal that is readily oxidised; e.g., iron, copper.

(05 Mar 2000)

base memory, basement, basement lamina, basement membrane < Prev | Next > base microscopical, basename

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base microscopicalmedical dictionary

<microscopy> The microscope's supporting structure such as the horseshoe type. Heavier bases, some containing the entire illuminating system, began to appear after World War II.

(05 Aug 1998)

basement, basement lamina, basement membrane, base metal < Prev | Next > basename, base of arytenoid cartilage

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<file system> The name of a file which, in contrast to a pathname, does not mention any of the directories containing the file. Examples:

pathname basename -------- -------- /etc/hosts hosts ./alma alma korte/a.a a.a a.a a.a

See also: pathname.

(01 Feb 1996)

base of arytenoid cartilagemedical dictionary

The part of the arytenoid cartilage that articulates with the cricoid cartilage and from which the muscular process extends laterally and the vocal process projects anteriorly.

Synonyms: basis cartilaginis arytenoideae.

(05 Mar 2000)

base of bladdermedical dictionary

Preferred term: fundus of urinary bladder

base of brainmedical dictionary

The inferior surface of the brain visible when seen from below.

Synonyms: facies inferior cerebri, basis cerebri, inferior cerebral surface.

(05 Mar 2000)

base of cochleamedical dictionary

The enlarged part of the cochlea that is directed posteriorly and medially and lies close to the internal acoustic meatus.

Synonyms: basis cochleae.

(05 Mar 2000)

base of heartmedical dictionary

That part of the heart that lies opposite the apex, formed mainly by the left atrium but to a small extent by the posterior part of the right atrium; it is directed backward and to the right and is separated from the vertebral column by the oesophagus and aorta.

Synonyms: basis cordis.

(05 Mar 2000)

base of hyoid bonemedical dictionary

Preferred term: body of hyoid bone

base of bladder, base of brain, base of cochlea, base of heart < Prev | Next > base of lung, base of mandible

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base of lungmedical dictionary

The lower concave part of the lung that rests upon the convexity of the diaphragm.

Synonyms: basis pulmonis.

(05 Mar 2000)

base of mandiblemedical dictionary

The rounded inferior border of the body of the mandible.

Synonyms: basis mandibulae.

(05 Mar 2000)

base of metacarpal bonemedical dictionary

The expanded proximal extremity of each metacarpal that articulates with one or more of the distal row of carpal bones.

Synonyms: basis ossis metacarpalis.

(05 Mar 2000)

base of metatarsal bonemedical dictionary

The expanded proximal extremity of each metatarsal bone; it articulates with one or more of the distal row of tarsal bones.

Synonyms: basis ossis metatarsalis.

(05 Mar 2000)

base of modiolusmedical dictionary

The part of the modiolus enclosed by the basal turn of the cochlea; it faces the lateral end of the internal acoustic meatus.

See: cochlear area.

Synonyms: basis modioli.

(05 Mar 2000)

base of patellamedical dictionary

The superior border of the patella to which the tendon of the rectus femoris attaches.

Synonyms: basis patellae.

(05 Mar 2000)

base of phalanxmedical dictionary

The expanded proximal end of each phalanx in the hand or foot that articulates with the head of the next proximal bone in the digit.

Synonyms: basis phalangis.

(05 Mar 2000)

base of prostatemedical dictionary

The broad upper surface of the prostate contiguous with the bladder wall.

Synonyms: basis prostatae.

(05 Mar 2000)

base of renal pyramidmedical dictionary

The outer broad part of a renal pyramid that lies next to the cortex.

Synonyms: basis pyramidis renis.

(05 Mar 2000)

base of sacrummedical dictionary

The upper end of the sacrum that articulates with the body of the fifth lumbar vertebra in the midline and the alae on either side.

Synonyms: basis ossis sacri.

(05 Mar 2000)

base of skullmedical dictionary

The sloping floor of the cranial cavity. It comprises both the external base of skull (external view) and the internal base of skull (internal view).

See: internal base of skull.

Synonyms: basis cranii, cranial base.

(05 Mar 2000)

base of stapesmedical dictionary

The flat portion of the stapes that fits in the oval window.

Synonyms: basis stapedis, footplate, foot-plate.

(05 Mar 2000)

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base of tonguemedical dictionary

Preferred term: root of tongue

<molecular biology> Two nitrogenous bases (adenine and thymine or guanine and cytosine) held together by weak bonds.

Two strands of DNA are held together in the shape of a double helix by the bonds between base pairs.

(09 Oct 1997)

base pairingmedical dictionary

<molecular biology> The specific hydrogen bonding between purines and pyrimidines in double stranded nucleic acids.

In DNA the pairs are adenine and thymine and guanine and cytosine, while in RNA they are adenine and uracil and guanine and cytosine.

Base pairing leads to the formation of a DNA double helix from two complementary single strands.

(15 Nov 1997)

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<cell biology> A hypothetical cell adhesion molecule possibly involved in sponge cell adhesion, existence unproven.

This entry appears with permission from the Dictionary of Cell and Molecular Biology

(11 Mar 2008)

baseplate waxmedical dictionary

A hard pink wax used in dentistry for making occlusion rims.

(05 Mar 2000)

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base projectionmedical dictionary

Preferred term: axial projection

base sequencemedical dictionary

<molecular biology> The order of nucleotide bases in a DNA molecule.

(09 Oct 1997)

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base sequence analysismedical dictionary

<molecular biology> A method, sometimes automated, for determining the base sequence.

(09 Oct 1997)

base-stackingmedical dictionary

A clustering of DNA or RNA bases in which the rings lie on top of each other.

(05 Mar 2000)

base substitutionmedical dictionary

<molecular biology> One nucleotide base is replaced by another in a DNA molecule. This is also called a point mutation.

(09 Oct 1997)

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Base Technologycomputing dictionary

<company>

The company which developed and distributes Liana.

MORE.

E-mail: Jack Krupansky <Jack@BaseTechnology.com> (owner).

Address: Base Technology, Attn: Jack Krupansky, 1500 Mass. Ave. NW #114 Washington, DC 2005, USA. 800-786-9505

Telephone: +1 800 876 9505.

(01 Apr 1999)

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The fundamental unit's of length, mass, time, electric current, thermodynamic temperature, amount of substance, and luminous intensity in the International System of Units (SI); the names and symbols of the unit's for these quantities are metre (m), kilogram (kg), second (s), ampere (A), kelvin (K), mole (mol), and candela (cd).

See: International System of Units.

(05 Mar 2000)

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Preferred term: submentovertex radiograph

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Preferred term: fundus of urinary bladder

base substitution, Base Technology, base units, base view < Prev | Next > bash, Basham's mixture, bashaw

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Bourne Again SHell. GNU's command interpreter for Unix. Bash is a Posix-compatible shell with full Bourne shell syntax, and some C shell commands built in. The Bourne Again Shell supports Emacs-style command-line editing, job control, functions, and on-line help. Written by Brian Fox of UCSB.

The latest version is 1.14.1. It includes a yacc parser, the interpreter and documentation.

FTP or from a GNU archive site. E-mail: <bug-bash@gnu.org>. Usenet newsgroup: gnu.bash.bug.

(01 Mar 1994)

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Basham's mixturemedical dictionary

base units, base view, bas-fond, bash < Prev | Next > bashaw, bashkiria, bashyle, basi-

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1. A Turkish title of honor, now written pasha. See Pasha.

2. A magnate or grandee.

3. <zoology> A very large siluroid fish (Leptops olivaris) of the Mississippi valley; also called goujon, mud cat, and yellow cat.

See: Pasha.

(01 Mar 1998)

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A subdivision of russia, a plateau and mountainous area of the southern urals. It has extensive forests and valuable mineral deposits.

(12 Dec 1998)

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<chemistry> See Basyle.

(01 Mar 1998)

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<prefix>

<anatomy, botany>

A combining form, especially in anatomical and botanical words, to indicate the base or position at or near a base; forming a base; as, basibranchials, the most ventral of the cartilages or bones of the branchial arches; basicranial, situated at the base of the cranium; basifacial, basitemporal, etc.

Origin: G. And L. Basis

(05 Feb 2009)

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Relating to a basis or the basion.

(05 Mar 2000)

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basialveolarmedical dictionary

Relating to both basion and alveolar points; denoting especially the basialveolar length, or the shortest distance between these two points.

(05 Mar 2000)

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basibregmatic axismedical dictionary

A line extending from the basion to the bregma.

(05 Mar 2000)

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<acronym>

<programming language>

Beginner's All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code. A simple language originally designed for ease of programming by students and beginners. Many dialects exist, and BASIC is popular on microcomputers with sound and graphics support. Most micro versions are interactive and interpreted.

BASIC has become the leading cause of brain-damage in proto-hackers. This is another case (like Pascal) of the cascading lossage that happens when a language deliberately designed as an educational toy gets taken too seriously. A novice can write short BASIC programs (on the order of 10-20 lines) very easily; writing anything longer is painful and encourages bad habits that will make it harder to use more powerful languages. This wouldn't be so bad if historical accidents hadn't made BASIC so common on low-end micros. As it is, it ruins thousands of potential wizards a year.

Originally, all references to code, both GOTO and GOSUB (subroutine call) referred to the destination by its line number. This allowed for very simple editing in the days before text editors were considered essential. Just typing the line number deleted the line and to edit a line you just typed the new line with the same number. Programs were typically numbered in steps of ten to allow for insertions. Later versions, such as BASIC V, allow GOTO-less structured programming with named procedures and functions, IF-THEN-ELSE-ENDIF constructs and WHILE loops etc.

Early BASICs had no graphic operations except with graphic characters. In the 1970s BASIC interpreters became standard features in mainframes and minicomputers. Some versions included matrix operations as language primitives.

A public domain interpreter for a mixture of DEC's MU-Basic and Microsoft Basic is here. A yacc parser and interpreter were in the comp.sources.unix archives volume 2.

See also: ANSI Minimal BASIC, bournebasic, bwBASIC, ubasic, Visual Basic.

(01 Mar 1995)

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1. <chemistry> Relating to a base; performing the office of a base in a salt. Having the base in excess, or the amount of the base atomically greater than that of the acid, or exceeding in proportion that of the related neutral salt.

Apparently alkaline, as certain normal salts which exhibit alkaline reactions with test paper.

2. <chemical>

Said of crystalline rocks which contain a relatively low percentage of silica, as basalt.

<chemistry> Basic salt, a salt formed from a base or hydroxide by the partial replacement of its hydrogen by a negative or acid element or radical.

(01 Mar 1998)

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basic amino acidmedical dictionary

An amino acid containing a second basic group (usually an amino group); e.g., lysine, arginine, ornithine.

Synonyms: dibasic amino acid.

(05 Mar 2000)

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basic anhydridemedical dictionary

<chemical>

A chemical (usually the oxide of a metal) which forms a base when it is mixed with water.

(09 Oct 1997)

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Basic Assembly Languagecomputing dictionary

(BAL) What most people called IBM 360 assembly language.

See ALC.

Acronym: BAL

(01 Mar 1995)

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BASIC AUTOCODERcomputing dictionary

Early system on IBM 7070. Listed in CACM 2(5):16 (May 1959).

(01 Apr 2006)

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<programming language>

A subset of COBOL from COBOL-60 standards.

[Sammet 1969, p. 339].

(01 Mar 1997)

Preferred term: alkaline-ash diet

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Dye's which ionise in solution to give positively charged ions or cations; the auxochrome group is an amine which can form a salt with an acid like HCl; solutions are usually slightly acidic; examples include basic fuchsin and toluidine blue O.

(05 Mar 2000)

basic electrical rhythmmedical dictionary

A slow wave of depolarisation of smooth muscle from the fundus to the pylorus that coordinates gastric peristalsis and emptying.

Acronym: BER

(05 Mar 2000)

Basic Encoding Rulescomputing dictionary

<protocol, standard> (BER) ASN.1 encoding rules for producing self-identifying and self-delimiting transfer syntax for data structures described in ASN.1 notations.

BER is an self-identifying and self-delimiting encoding scheme, which means that each data value can be identified, extracted and decoded individually.

Huw Rogers once described BER as "a triumph of bloated theory over clean implementation". He also criticises it as designed around bitstreams with arbitrary boundaries between data which can only be determined at a high level.

Documents: ITU-T X.690, ISO 8825-1.

See also: CER, DER, PER.

(01 Apr 1998)

<zoology> The second joint of the antennae of crustaceans.

Origin: Basi- + Gr. Horn, antenna.

(01 Mar 1998)

basic esotropiamedical dictionary

Preferred term: nonaccommodative esotropia

basic exotropiamedical dictionary

Exotropia in which the strabismus is the same for near and far vision.

(05 Mar 2000)

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<programming language>

A subset of Fortran.

[Sammet 1969, p. 150].

(01 Apr 1999)

basic fuchsinmedical dictionary

A triphenylmethane dye whose dominant component is pararosanilin; an important stain in histology, histochemistry, and bacteriology.

Synonyms: diamond fuchsin.

(05 Mar 2000)

basic fuchsin-methylene blue stainmedical dictionary

<technique>

A stain for intact epoxy sections; semi-thick sections of plastic-embedded tissues have nuclei stained purple; collagen, elastic lamina, and connective tissue are stained blue; mitochondria, myelin, and lipid droplets are stained red; cytoplasm, smooth muscle cells, axoplasm, and chrondroblasts are stained pink.

(05 Mar 2000)

Basic Input/Output Systemcomputing dictionary

<operating system> (BIOS, ROM BIOS) The part of the system software of the IBM PC and compatibles that provides the lowest level interface to peripheral devices and controls the first stage of the bootstrap process, including installing the operating system. The BIOS is stored in ROM, or equivalent, in every PC. Its main task is to load and execute the operating system which is usually stored on the computer's hard disk, but may be loaded from CD-ROM or floppy disk at install time.

In order to provide acceptable performance (e.g. for screen display), some software vendors access the routines in the BIOS directly, rather than using the higher level operating system calls. Thus, the BIOS in the compatible computer must be 100% compatible with the IBM BIOS.

As if that wasn't bad enough, many application programs bypass even the BIOS and address the screen hardware directly just as the BIOS does. Consequently, register level compatibility is required in the compatible's display electronics, which means that it must provide the same storage locations and identification as the original IBM hardware.

Acronym: BIOS

(01 Apr 1999)

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<chemistry> The quality or state of being a base.

The power of an acid to unite with one or more atoms or equivalents of a base, as indicated by the number of replaceable hydrogen atoms contained in the acid.

(01 Mar 1998)

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<programming language>

A subset of JOVIAL written ca. 1965.

[Sammet 1969, p.529].

(01 Mar 1995)

Basic Language for Implementation of System Softwarecomputing dictionary

<programming language>

(BLISS, or allegedly, "System Software Implementation Language, Backwards") A language designed by W.A. Wulf at CMU around 1969.

BLISS is an expression language. It is block-structured, and typeless, with exception handling facilities, coroutines, a macro system, and a highly optimising compiler. It was one of the first non-assembly languages for operating system implementation. It gained fame for its lack of a goto and also lacks implicit dereferencing: all symbols stand for addresses, not values.

Another characteristic (and possible explanation for the backward acronym) was that BLISS fairly uniformly used backward keywords for closing blocks, a famous example being ELUDOM to close a MODULE. An exception was BEGIN...END though you could use (...) instead.

DEC introduced the NOVALUE keyword in their dialects to allow statements to not return a value.

Versions: CMU BLISS-10 for the PDP-10; CMU BLISS-11, BLISS-16, DEC BLISS-16C, DEC BLISS-32, BLISS-36 for VAX/VMS, BLISS-36C.

["BLISS: A Language for Systems Programming", CACM 14(12):780-790, Dec 1971].

[Did the B stand for "Better"?]

Acronym: BLISS

(01 Mar 1997)

basic life supportmedical dictionary
basic medical trainingeducation dictionary

<medical training>

Acronym: BMT

(14 Jan 2009)

Basic Multilingual Planecomputing dictionary

<text, standard> (BMP) The first plane defined in Unicode/ISO 10646, designed to include all scripts in active modern use. The BMP currently includes the Latin, Greek, Cyrillic, Devangari, hiragana, katakana, and Cherokee scripts, among others, and a large body of mathematical, APL-related, and other miscellaneous characters. Most of the Han ideographs in current use are present in the BMP, but due to the large number of ideographs, many were placed in the Supplementary Ideographic Plane.

Unicode home.

Acronym: BMP

(01 Jul 2002)

Basic Object Adaptercomputing dictionary

<computer architecture> (BOA) Part of the CORBA architecture.

[Details?]

Acronym: BOA

(01 Sep 2004)

Basic Object Systemcomputing dictionary

<computer programming> (BOS) A C-callable library that implements the notion of object and which uses Tcl as its interpreter for interpreted methods (you can have "compiled" methods in C, and mix compiled and interpreted methods in the same object, plus lots more). You can subclass and mix in existing objects using BOS to extend, among other things, the set of tk widgets. BOS is a class-free object system, also called a prototype-based object system; it is modelled loosely on the Self system from Stanford University.

Version 1.31 by Sean Levy <Sean.Levy@cs.cmu.edu>.

FTP.

(01 Feb 1992)

Basic Operating Systemcomputing dictionary

<operating system> (BOS) An early [when?] IBM operating system.

According to folklore, BOS was the predecessor to TOS on the IBM 360 and it was IPL'd from a card reader. It may have been intended for very small 360's with no disks and limited tape drives.

BOS died out really early [when?] as disks such as the 2311 and 2314 became common with the IBM 360, whereas disks had been a real luxury on the IBM 7090.

(01 Apr 1999)

A base anhydride; an oxide of an electropositive element or radical; it can combine with water to form a base.

(05 Mar 2000)

basic personalitymedical dictionary

Preferred term: basic personality type

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basic personality typemedical dictionary

An individual's unique, covert, or underlying personality propensities, whether or not they are behaviourally manifest or overt, personality characteristics of an individual which are also shared by a majority of the members of a social group.

(05 Mar 2000)

basic polypeptide-activated protein kinasemedical dictionary

<enzyme>

<cell biology> Requires mn2+ for its activity; from bombyx mori; does not require cyclicamp, cyclicgmp or ca

Registry number: EC 2.7.1.-

Synonyms: ba kinase

(26 Jun 1999)

Basic Programming Supportcomputing dictionary

<operating system, tool> (BPS, colloquially: Barely Programming Support) A suite of utility routines from IBM to perform very simple procedures like formatting a disk or labelling a tape. BPS was only available on punched cards.

[Dates?]

Acronym: BPS

(01 Apr 1998)

basic proteinsmedical dictionary

Proteins that are rich in basic amino acids; e.g., histones.

(05 Mar 2000)

Relating to the base of the skull.

(05 Mar 2000)

basicranial axismedical dictionary

A line drawn from the basion to the midpoint of the sphenoethmoidal suture.

(05 Mar 2000)

basicranial flexuremedical dictionary

Preferred term: pontine flexure

Basic Rate Interfacecomputing dictionary

<communications> (BRI, 2B+D, 2B1D) An Integrated Services Digital Network channel consisting of two 64 kbps "bearer" (B) channels and one 16 kbps "delta" (D) channel, giving a total data rate of 144 kbps. The B channels are used for voice or user data, and the D channel is used for control and signalling and/or X.25 packet networking. BRI is the kind of ISDN interface most likely to be found in residential service.

Acronym: BRI

(01 Jul 2002)

basic reactionmedical dictionary

Preferred term: alkaline reaction

basic reproductive rate, ratiomedical dictionary

<epidemiology> See Reproductive Ratio.

(05 Dec 1998)

A salt in which there are one or more hydroxyl ions not replaced by the electronegative element of an acid; e.g., Fe(OH)2Cl.

(05 Mar 2000)

<technique>

A dye in which the cation is the coloured component of the dye molecule that binds to anionic groups of nucleic acids (PO4&equiv;) or acidic mucopolysaccharides (e.g., chondroitin sulfate).

(05 Mar 2000)

basic surgical trainingeducation dictionary

<medical training>

Acronym: BST

(14 Jan 2009)

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The version of the Basic programming language which comes on ROM in Acorn's RISC computers: the Archimedes range and the RiscPC. It features REPEAT and WHILE loops, multi-line IF statements, procedures and functions, local variables, error handling, system calls and a built-in assembler.

(01 Jan 1995)

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Basidiobolusmedical dictionary

<fungus>

<mycology> A genus of fungi belonging to the class Zygomycetes. Basidiobolus haptosporus has been isolated from cases of zygomycosis (entomophthoramycosis basidiobolae) in humans, especially in Indonesia, tropical Africa, and Southeast Asia.

Origin: Mod. L. Basidium, dim. Of G. Basis, base, + L. Bolus, fr. G. Bolos, lump or clod

(05 Mar 2000)

basidiomycetesmedical dictionary

<fungus>

<mycology> A class of true fungi more commonly known as club fungi, so called because they produce their spores at the tips of swollen hyphae that look a bit like clubs or baseball bats. This division includes mushrooms, puffballs, earth stars, stinkhorns, bracket fungi, rust, smuts, jelly fungi andbird's-nest fungi.

(09 Oct 1997)

basidiomycetes shitake mushroomsmedical dictionary

<fungus>

<mycology> A class of true fungi more commonly known as club fungi, so called because they produce their spores at the tips of swollen hyphae that look a bit like clubs or baseball bats. This division includes mushrooms, puffballs, earth stars, stinkhorns, bracket fungi, rust, smuts, jelly fungi and bird's-nest fungi.

(09 Oct 1997)

Basidiomycotamedical dictionary

<fungus>

<mycology> A phylum of fungi characterised by a spore-bearing organ, the basidium, that is usually a clavate cell that bears basidiospores after karyogamy and meiosis. Some mycologists have raised the class Basidiomycetes to the phylum or division level.

(05 Mar 2000)

basidiosporemedical dictionary

Spores of Basidiomycete fungi. These spores are usually uninucleate and haploid.

This entry appears with permission from the Dictionary of Cell and Molecular Biology

(11 Mar 2008)

Club shaped organ involved in sexual reproduction in basidiomycete fungi (mushrooms, toadstools etc.). Bears four haploid basidiospores at its tip.

This entry appears with permission from the Dictionary of Cell and Molecular Biology

(11 Mar 2008)

Relating to the lower portion of the face.

(05 Mar 2000)

basifacial axismedical dictionary

A line drawn from the subnasal point to the midpoint of the sphenoethmoidal suture.

Synonyms: facial axis.

(05 Mar 2000)

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<chemistry> That which converts into a salifiable base.

(01 Mar 1998)

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Attached at or by the base, for example of anthers, by the base of the connective.

(09 Oct 1997)

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<botany> Tending or proceeding away from the base; as, a basifugal growth.

Origin: Base,+ L. Fugere to flee.

(01 Mar 1998)

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<chemistry> To convert into a salifiable base.

Origin: Base + -fy.

(01 Mar 1998)

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<botany> The pedicel on which the ovary of certain flowers, as the passion flower, is seated; a carpophore or thecaphore.

Origin: NL, fr. Gr. Base + woman.

(01 Mar 1998)

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<anatomy> Noting two small bones, forming the body of the inverted hyoid arch.

Origin: Basi- + Gr. (the letter "upsilon"); from the shape.

(01 Mar 1998)

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<anatomy> The central tongue bone.

Origin: Basi- + hyoid.

(01 Mar 1998)

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The skin of a sheep tanned with bark.

Origin: Corrupt. From E. Basan, F. Basane, LL. Basanium, bazana, fr. Ar. Bithana, prop, lining.

<botany> The name given to several aromatic herbs of the Mint family, but chiefly to the common or sweet basil (Ocymum basilicum), and the bush basil, or lesser basil (O. Minimum), the leaves of which are used in cookery. The name is also given to several kinds of mountain mint (Pycnanthemum). Basil thyme, a name given to the fragrant herbs Calamintha Acinos and C. Nepeta. Wild basil, a plant (Calamintha clinopodium) of the Mint family.

Origin: F. Basilic, fr. L. Badilicus royal, Gr, fr. King.

(01 Mar 1998)

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Relating to the base of a pyramidal or broad structure.

(05 Mar 2000)

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basilar anglemedical dictionary

An angle formed by the intersection at the basion of lines coming from the nasal spine and the nasal point.

(05 Mar 2000)

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basilar apophysismedical dictionary

basihyoid, basil, basilar, basilar angle < Prev | Next > basilar artery, basilar bone, basilar cartilage

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basilar arterymedical dictionary

<artery>

<anatomy> Supplies the pons and gives rise to the vertebral arteries, Provides branches to the cerebrum and cerebellum.

(27 Sep 1997)

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basilar bonemedical dictionary

The developmental basilar process of the occipital bone which unites with the condylar portions in about the fourth or fifth year, becoming the basilar part of the occipital bone.

Synonyms: basioccipital bone, os basilare.

(05 Mar 2000)

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basilar cartilagemedical dictionary
basilar cellmedical dictionary

Preferred term: basal cell

basilar crest of cochlear ductmedical dictionary

<anatomy>

An inward projection of the spiral ligament of the cochlea to which is attached the basilar membrane forming the floor of the cochlear duct.

Synonyms: crista basilaris ductus cochlearis.

(05 Mar 2000)

basilar fibrocartilagemedical dictionary

Preferred term: basilar cartilage

basilar impressionmedical dictionary

An invagination of the base of the skull into the posterior fossa with compression of the brainstem and cerebellar structures into the foramen magnum.

Compare: platybasia.

(05 Mar 2000)

basilar indexmedical dictionary

Ratio between the basialveolar line and the maximum length of the cranium, according to the formula: (basialveolar line &times; 100)/length of cranium.

Synonyms: alveolar index.

(05 Mar 2000)

basilar interstitial lung diseasemedical dictionary

<radiology> B bronchiectasis, A asbestosis, D drugs / DIP, L lymphangitic metastasis / LAM, A aspiration, S sarcoidosis, S scleroderma

(12 Dec 1998)

basilar invaginationmedical dictionary

<radiology> Dens projects into base of skull, McGregor's line greater than 4.5 mm, Chamberlain's line greater than 3 mm, may lead to obstructive hydrocephalus aetiology: primary anomalies of occiput, atlas, axis, softened bone: rickets / osteomalacia, Paget's disease, fibrous dysplasia, dysostoses: OI, achondroplasia, cleidocranial dysostosis Cf: platybasia

(12 Dec 1998)

basilar laminamedical dictionary

Preferred term: basilar membrane

basilar membranemedical dictionary

A thin layer of tissue covered with mesothelial cells that separates the cochlea from the scala tympani in the ear.

This entry appears with permission from the Dictionary of Cell and Molecular Biology

(11 Mar 2008)

basilar meningitismedical dictionary

Meningitis at the base of the brain, due usually to tuberculosis, syphilis, or any low-grade chronic granulomatous process; may result in an internal hydrocephalus.

(05 Mar 2000)

basilar migrainemedical dictionary

A migraine accompanied by transient brainstem signs (vertigo, tinnitus, perioral numbness, diplopia, etc.) thought to be due to vasospastic narrowing of the basilar artery.

(05 Mar 2000)

basilar part of ponsmedical dictionary

Preferred term: ventral part of pons

basilar part of the occipital bonemedical dictionary
basilar plexusmedical dictionary

A venous plexus on the clivus, connected with the cavernous and petrosal sinuses and the internal vertebral (epidural) venous plexus.

Synonyms: plexus basilaris, basilar sinus.

(05 Mar 2000)

basilar pontine sulcusmedical dictionary

A median groove on the ventral surface of the pons varolii in which lies the basilar artery.

Synonyms: sulcus basilaris pontis, basilar sulcus.

(05 Mar 2000)

basilar processmedical dictionary
basilar process of occipital bonemedical dictionary
basilar prognathismmedical dictionary

The concave facial profile, or forward position of the chin, resembling mandibular prognathism, created by the prominence of the bone of the mandible at the chin or menton.

(05 Mar 2000)

basilar sinusmedical dictionary

Preferred term: basilar plexus

basilar sulcusmedical dictionary

Preferred term: basilar pontine sulcus

basilar vertebramedical dictionary

The lowest lumbar vertebra.

(05 Mar 2000)

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Relating to the base and one or more sides of any part.

(05 Mar 2000)

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Synonyms: basement membrane.

Origin: basi-+ G. Lemma, rind

(05 Mar 2000)

basilar sinus, basilar sulcus, basilar vertebra, basilateral < Prev | Next > basilica, basilical, basilicon

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Origin: L. Basilica, Gr. (sc, or) fr. Royal, fr. King.

Originally, the place of a king; but afterward, an apartment provided in the houses of persons of importance, where assemblies were held for dispensing justice; and hence, any large hall used for this purpose.

2. A building used by the Romans as a place of public meeting, with court rooms, etc, attached. A church building of the earlier centuries of Christianity, the plan of which was taken from the basilica of the Romans. The name is still applied to some churches by way of honorary distinction.

(01 Mar 1998)

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1. Royal; kingly; also, basilican.

2. <anatomy> Pertaining to certain parts, anciently supposed to have a specially important function in the animal economy, as the middle vein of the right arm.

See: Basilica.

(01 Mar 1998)

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<medicine> An ointment composed of wax, pitch, resin, and olive oil, lard, or other fatty substance.

Origin: L. Basilicon, Gr, neut. Of: cf. F. Basilicon. See Basilica.

(01 Mar 1998)

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Denoting a prominent or important part or structure.

Origin: L. Fr. G. Basilikos, royal

(05 Mar 2000)

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basilic veinmedical dictionary

<vein>

<anatomy> Arises from the ulnar side of the dorsal venous network of the hand; it curves around the medial side of the forearm, communicates with the cephalic vein via the median cubital vein, and passes up the medial side of the arm to join the axillary vein.

Synonyms: vena basilica.

(05 Mar 2000)

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basiliscusfibrasemedical dictionary

<enzyme>

<cell biology> A zn-dependent fibrinolytic enzyme; from the venom of crotalus basiliscus basiliscus; cleaves the aalpha-chain of fibrinogen at lys(413)-leu(414); cbfib1.1 and 1.2 also cleave ser(505)-thr(506) and tyr(560)-ser(561); cbfib3 also cleaves gly(204)-ser(205) and pro(516)-met(517)

Registry number: EC 3.4.24.-

Synonyms: basiliscusfibrase 1, basiliscusfibrase 2, basiliscusfibrase 3, cbfib1.1, cbfib1.2, cbfib3, basilase

(26 Jun 1999)

basilical, basilicon, basilicus, basilic vein < Prev | Next > basilisk, Basil Martin Wright, basin

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1. A fabulous serpent, or dragon. The ancients alleged that its hissing would drive away all other serpents, and that its breath, and even its look, was fatal. See Cockatrice. "Make me not sighted like the basilisk." (Shak)

2. <zoology> A lizard of the genus Basiliscus, belonging to the family Iguanidae.

This genus is remarkable for a membranous bag rising above the occiput, which can be filled with air at pleasure; also for an elevated crest along the back, that can be raised or depressed at will.

3. A large piece of ordnance, so called from its supposed resemblance to the serpent of that name, or from its size.

Origin: L. Basiliscus, Gr. Little king, kind of serpent, dim. Of king; so named from some prominences on the head resembling a crown.

(01 Mar 1998)

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Basil Martin Wrightbiographical dictionary

<person>

Preferred term: Wright, Basil Martin

basilicus, basilic vein, basiliscusfibrase, basilisk < Prev | Next > basin, basinasal, basinasal line

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1. A hollow vessel or dish, to hold water for washing, and for various other uses.

2. The quantity contained in a basin.

3. A hollow vessel, of various forms and materials, used in the arts or manufactures, as that used by glass grinders for forming concave glasses, by hatters for molding a hat into shape, etc.

4. A hollow place containing water, as a pond, a dock for ships, a little bay.

5. <physics> A circular or oval valley, or depression of the surface of the ground, the lowest part of which is generally occupied by a lake, or traversed by a river. The entire tract of country drained by a river, or sloping towards a sea or lake.

6. <geology> An isolated or circumscribed formation, particularly where the strata dip inward, on all sides, toward a center; especially applied to the coal formations, called coal basins or coal fields.

Origin: OF. Bacin, F. Bassin, LL. Bacchinus, fr. Bacca a water vessel, fr. L. Bacca berry, in allusion to the round shape; or perh. Fr. Celtic. Cf. Bac.

(01 Mar 1998)

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Relating to the basion and the nasion; denoting especially the basinasal length, or the shortest distance between the two points.

(05 Mar 2000)

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basinasal linemedical dictionary

A line connecting the basion and the nasion.

Synonyms: nasobasilar line.

(05 Mar 2000)

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<prefix>

Preferred term: basi-

basioccipitalmedical dictionary

<anatomy> Of or pertaining to the bone in the base of the cranium, frequently forming a part of the occipital in the adult, but usually distinct in the young.

The basioccipital bone.

Origin: Basi- + occipital.

(01 Mar 1998)

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basioccipital bonemedical dictionary

Preferred term: basilar bone

basinasal, basinasal line, basio-, basioccipital < Prev | Next > basiocciput, basioglossus, basion

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basioglossusmedical dictionary

The portion of the hyoglossus muscle that originates from the body of the hyoid bone.

(05 Mar 2000)

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<anatomy> The middle of the anterior margin of the great foramen of the skull.

Origin: Gr. A base.

(01 Mar 1998)

Developing, in sequence, from the apex towards the base.

Compare: acropetal.

(09 Oct 1997)

basioccipital bone, basiocciput, basioglossus, basion < Prev | Next > basipharyngeal canal, basiphobia, basipodite

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basipharyngeal canalmedical dictionary

<anatomy>

Preferred term: vomerovaginal canal

basiocciput, basioglossus, basion, basipetal < Prev | Next > basiphobia, basipodite, basipterygium

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<phobia>

<psychiatry> Morbid fear of walking.

Origin: G. Basis, a stepping, + phobos, fear

(05 Mar 2000)

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<anatomy> The basal joint of the legs of Crustacea.

Origin: Basi- +, foot.

(01 Mar 1998)

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basipterygiummedical dictionary

<anatomy> A bar of cartilage at the base of the embryonic fins of some fishes. It develops into the metapterygium. Basipteryg"ial.

Origin: NL, fr. Gr. A base + a fin.

(01 Mar 1998)

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basipterygoidmedical dictionary

<anatomy> Applied to a protuberance of the base of the sphenoid bone.

Origin: Basi- + pierygoid.

(01 Mar 1998)

Synonyms: base.

Origin: L. And G.

(05 Mar 2000)

basis cartilaginis arytenoideaemedical dictionary

Preferred term: base of arytenoid cartilage

basipodite, basipterygium, basipterygoid, basis < Prev | Next > basis cerebri, basis cochleae, basiscopic

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basis cerebrimedical dictionary

Preferred term: base of brain

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basis cochleaemedical dictionary

Preferred term: base of cochlea

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Pointing towards the base (applied to the first lateral vein of a leaflet on the side nearer the leaf base).

(09 Oct 1997)

basis cordismedical dictionary

Preferred term: base of heart

basis craniimedical dictionary

Preferred term: base of skull

basis cranii externamedical dictionary

An alternate term for external base of skull.

(05 Mar 2000)

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basis cranii internamedical dictionary

Preferred term: internal base of skull

basis mandibulaemedical dictionary

Preferred term: base of mandible

basis modiolimedical dictionary

Preferred term: base of modiolus

<botany> Prolonged at the base, as certain leaves.

Origin: Basi- + solute, a.

(01 Mar 1998)

basis ossis metacarpalismedical dictionary

Preferred term: base of metacarpal bone

basis ossis metatarsalismedical dictionary

Preferred term: base of metatarsal bone

basis ossis sacrimedical dictionary

Preferred term: base of sacrum

basis patellaemedical dictionary

Preferred term: base of patella

basis pedunculimedical dictionary

The base of the midbrain consisting of the crus cerebri and substantia nigra.

See: cerebral peduncle.

(05 Mar 2000)

basis phalangismedical dictionary

Preferred term: base of phalanx

basisphenoidmedical dictionary

<anatomy> The basisphenoid bone.

(01 Mar 1998)

basisphenoidalmedical dictionary

<anatomy> Of or pertaining to that part of the base of the cranium between the basioccipital and the presphenoid, which usually ossifies separately in the embryo or in the young, and becomes a part of the sphenoid in the adult.

Origin: Basi- + spheroid.

(01 Mar 1998)

basisphenoid bonemedical dictionary

In comparative anatomy, the bone in the floor of the braincase in the region of the pituitary.

See: body of sphenoid bone.

(05 Mar 2000)

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basis prostataemedical dictionary

Preferred term: base of prostate

basis pulmonismedical dictionary

Preferred term: base of lung

basis pyramidis renismedical dictionary

Preferred term: base of renal pyramid

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basis stapedismedical dictionary

Preferred term: base of stapes

basitemporalmedical dictionary

Relating to the lower part of the temporal region.

(05 Mar 2000)

basivertebralmedical dictionary

Relating to the body of a vertebra.

(05 Mar 2000)

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basivertebral veinmedical dictionary

<vein>

<anatomy> One of a number of veins in the spongy substance of the bodies of the vertebrae, emptying into the anterior internal vertebral venous plexus.

Synonyms: vena basivertebralis.

(05 Mar 2000)

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1. A vessel made of osiers or other twigs, cane, rushes, splints, or other flexible material, interwoven. "Rude baskets . . . Woven of the flexile willow."

2. The contents of a basket; as much as a basket contains; as, a basket of peaches.

3. The bell or vase of the Corinthian capital.

4. The two back seats facing one another on the outside of a stagecoach. Basket fish, a lepidopterous insect of the genus Thyridopteryx and allied genera, especially. T. Ephemeraeformis. The larva makes and carries about a bag or basket-like case of silk and twigs, which it afterwards hangs up to shelter the pupa and wingless adult females.

Origin: Of unknown origin. The modern Celtic words seem to be from the English.

(01 Mar 1998)

A competitive team sport played on a rectangular court having a raised basket at each end.

(12 Dec 1998)

Cerebellar neurones with many small dendritic branches that enclose the cell bodies of adjacent Purkinje cells in a basket like array.

This entry appears with permission from the Dictionary of Cell and Molecular Biology

(11 Mar 2008)

basking sharkmedical dictionary

<zoology> One of the largest species of sharks (Cetorhinus maximus), so called from its habit of basking in the sun; the liver shark, or bone shark. It inhabits the northern seas of Europe and America, and grows to a length of more than forty feet. It is a harmless species.

(01 Mar 1998)

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Basle Nomina Anatomicamedical dictionary

The name adopted in 1895 in Basel, Switzerland (French spelling, Basle) by members of the German Anatomical Society which met to compile a Latin nomenclature of anatomical terms. Revisions of the resulting nomenclature were published at intervals until, in 1955 in Paris, France, the international membership of the Congress of Anatomists adopted a modification of the Basle Nomina Anatomica terminology. That modification dropped the reference to the original meeting place.

See: Nomina Anatomica.

Acronym: BNA

(05 Mar 2000)

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Synonyms: basophilic leukocyte.

Origin: G. Basis, base, + kytos, cell

(05 Mar 2000)

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basocytopeniamedical dictionary

Preferred term: basophilic leukopenia

Preferred term: basophilic leukocytosis

basoerythrocytemedical dictionary
basoerythrocytosismedical dictionary

An increase of red blood cells with basophilic degenerative changes, frequently observed in diseases characterised by prolonged hypochromic anaemia.

(05 Mar 2000)

An instrument that makes graphic records of abnormalities of gait.

Origin: baso-+ G. Grapho, to write

(05 Mar 2000)

Basal and lateral; specifically used to refer to one of the two major cytological divisions of the amygdaloid complex.

See: amygdaloid body.

(05 Mar 2000)

basolateral plasma membranemedical dictionary

<cell biology> The plasma membrane of epithelial cells that is adjacent to the basal lamina or the adjoining cells of the sheet. Differs both in protein and phospholipid composition from the apical plasma membrane from which it is isolated by tight junctions (zonula occludentes).

This entry appears with permission from the Dictionary of Cell and Molecular Biology

(11 Mar 2008)

basometachromophilmedical dictionary

Basometachromophile

Staining metachromatically with a basic dye.

See: metachromasia.

(05 Mar 2000)

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basommatophoramedical dictionary

<zoology> A group of Pulmonifera having the eyes at the base of the tentacles, including the common pond snails.

Origin: NL, fr. Gr. Base + eye + to bear.

(01 Mar 1998)

Synonyms: basophilic leukopenia.

Origin: baso-+ G. Penia, poverty

(05 Mar 2000)

<haematology> Mammalian granulocyte with large heterochromatic basophilic granules that contain histamine bound to a protein and heparin like mucopolysaccharide matrix. They are not phagocytic. Very similar to mast cells though it is not clear whether they have common lineage.

This entry appears with permission from the Dictionary of Cell and Molecular Biology

(11 Mar 2008)

basophil adenomamedical dictionary

<tumour>

A tumour of the adenohypophysis in which the cell cytoplasm stains with basic dyes, often ACTH producing.

(05 Mar 2000)

basophil cell of anterior lobe of hypophysismedical dictionary
basophil degranulation testmedical dictionary

An in vitro test used in the diagnosis of allergies including drug hypersensitivity. The allergen is added to the patient's white blood cells and the subsequent histamine release is measured.

(12 Dec 1998)

basophil granulemedical dictionary

A granule that stains readily with a basic dye.

(05 Mar 2000)

1. Having an affinity for basic dyes.

2. <haematology> Condition in which there is an excess of basophils in the blood.

This entry appears with permission from the Dictionary of Cell and Molecular Biology

(11 Mar 2008)

Denoting tissue components having an affinity for basic dyes under specific pH conditions.

Synonyms: basophil, basophile.

(05 Mar 2000)

basophilic degenerationmedical dictionary

Blue staining of connective tissues when haematoxylin-eosin stain is used; found in such conditions as solar elastosis.

(05 Mar 2000)

basophilic leukaemiamedical dictionary

A form of granulocytic leukaemia in which there are unusually great numbers of basophilic granulocytes in the tissues and circulating blood; in some instances, the immature and mature basophilic forms may represent from 40 to 80% of the total numbers of white blood cells.

Synonyms: mast cell leukaemia.

American spelling: basophilic leukemia

(05 Mar 2000)

basophilic leukocytemedical dictionary

A polymorphonuclear leukocyte characterised by many large, coarse, metachromatic granules (dark purple or blue-black when treated with Wright's or similar stains) that usually fill the cytoplasm and may almost mask the nucleus; these leukocyte's are unique in that they usually do not occur in increased numbers as the result of acute infectious disease, and their phagocytic qualities are probably not significant; the granules, which contain heparin and histamine, may degranulate in response to hypersensitivity reactions and can be of significance in general inflammation.

Synonyms: basocyte, basophilocyte, mast leukocyte.

(05 Mar 2000)

basophilic leukocytosismedical dictionary

The presence of an abnormally large number of basophilic granulocytes in the blood.

Synonyms: basocytosis.

(05 Mar 2000)

basophilic leukopeniamedical dictionary

A decrease in the number of basophilic granulocytes normally present in the circulating blood (difficult to evaluate, owing to the small and variable number normally present).

Synonyms: basocytopenia, basopenia.

(05 Mar 2000)

basophilic substancemedical dictionary

Preferred term: nissl substance

Synonyms: basophilia.

(05 Mar 2000)

basophilocytemedical dictionary

Preferred term: basophilic leukocyte

Granular leukocytes characterised by a relatively pale-staining, lobate nucleus and cytoplasm containing coarse dark-staining granules of variable size and stainable by basic dyes.

(12 Dec 1998)

basophil substancemedical dictionary

Preferred term: nissl substance

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That part of the cytoplasm that stains readily with basic dyes.

(05 Mar 2000)

basosquamous carcinomamedical dictionary

<tumour>

A carcinoma of the skin which in structure and behaviour is considered transitional between basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma The term should not be used for the much more common keratotic variety of basal cell carcinoma, in which the tumour cells are of basal type but which contains small foci of abrupt keratinization.

Synonyms: basal squamous cell carcinoma.

(05 Mar 2000)

<zoology>

1. An edible, spiny-finned fish, especially. Of the genera Roccus, Labrax, and related genera. There are many species.

The common European bass is Labrax lupus. American species are: the striped bass (Roccus lineatus); white or silver bass of the lakes. (R. Chrysops); brass or yellow bass (R. Interruptus).

2. The two American fresh water species of black bass (genus Micropterus). See Black bass.

3. Species of Serranus, the sea bass and rock bass. See Sea bass.

4. The southern, red, or channel bass (Sciaena ocellata). See Redfish.

The name is also applied to many other fishes. See Calico bass, under Calico.

1. <botany> The linden or lime tree, sometimes wrongly called whitewood; also, its bark, which is used for making mats. See Bast.

2. A hassock or thick mat.

Origin: A corruption of bast.

(01 Mar 1998)

<person>

A U.S. Physician, *1903.

See: Bassen-Kornzweig syndrome.

(05 Mar 2000)

Bassen-Kornzweig syndromemedical dictionary

basoplasm, basosquamous carcinoma, bass, Bassen, Frank < Prev | Next > basset, basset hound, Bassini, Edoardo

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<geology> Inclined upward; as, the basset edge of strata.

Origin: Cf. OF. Basset somewhat low, dim. Of bas low.

<geology> The edge of a geological stratum at the surface of the ground; the outcrop.

<geology> To inclined upward so as to appear at the surface; to crop out; as, a vein of coal bassets.

Origin: Basseted; Basseting.

(01 Mar 1998)

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basset houndmedical dictionary

<zoology> A small kind of hound with a long body and short legs, used as an earth dog.

Origin: F. Basset.

(01 Mar 1998)

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Bassini, Edoardobiographical dictionary

<person>

An Italian surgeon, 1844-1924.

See: Bassini's operation.

(05 Mar 2000)

Bassini's operationmedical dictionary

An operation for an inguinal hernia repair; after reduction of the hernia, the sac is twisted, ligated, and cut off, then a new inguinal canal is made by uniting the edge of the internal oblique muscle to the inguinal ligament, placing on this the cord, and covering the latter by the external oblique muscle.

(05 Mar 2000)

Bassler, Anthonybiographical dictionary

<person>

A U.S. Physician, 1874-1959.

See: Bassler's sign.

(05 Mar 2000)

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Bassler's signmedical dictionary

<clinical sign>

<clinical examination> In chronic appendicitis, pinching the appendix between the thumb and the iliacus muscle causes sharp pain.

(05 Mar 2000)

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A gum from Iran and Turkey, resembling tragacanth, acacia, and the gummy exudate of cherry and plum trees; used in making storax.

(05 Mar 2000)

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<chemistry> A constituent part of a species of gum from Bassora, as also of gum tragacanth and some gum resins. It is one of the amyloses.

Origin: Cf. F. Bassorine.

(01 Mar 1998)

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<botany> The bass (Tilia) or its wood; especially, T. Americana. See Bass, the lime tree. "All the bowls were made of basswood, White and polished very smoothly." (Longfellow)

(01 Mar 1998)

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1. The inner fibrous bark of various plants; especially. Of the lime tree; hence, matting, cordage, etc, made therefrom.

2. A thick mat or hassock. See Bass.

Origin: AS. Baest; akin to Icel, Sw, Dan, D, & G. Bast, of unknown origin. Cf. Bass the tree.

(01 Mar 1998)

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1. Begotten and born out of lawful matrimony; illegitimate. See Bastard, note.

2. Lacking in genuineness; spurious; false; adulterate; applied to things which resemble those which are genuine, but are really not so. "That bastard self-love which is so vicious in itself, and productive of so many vices." (Barrow)

3. Of an unusual make or proportion; as, a bastard musket; a bastard culverin.

4. Abbreviated, as the half title in a page preceding the full title page of a book.

<medicine> Bastard ashlar, three to five quill feathers on a small joint corresponding to the thumb in some mam malia; the alula.

(01 Mar 1998)

Bassora gum, bassorin, basswood, bast < Prev | Next > Bastard Operator From Hell, Bastedo's sign

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Bastard Operator From Hellcomputing dictionary

<humour> A rogue network operator character invented by Simon Travaglia <simontrav@hotmail.com>, regularly featured in "Computing" and "DATAMATION" magazine.

See also: Dilbert.

MORE.

Acronym: BOFH

(01 Apr 1999)

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Bastedo's signmedical dictionary

basswood, bast, bastard, Bastard Operator From Hell < Prev | Next > Bastedo, Walter, bastion host, basyle

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<person>

A U.S. Physician, 1873-1952.

See: Bastedo's sign.

(05 Mar 2000)

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Preferred term: proxy gateway

Bastard Operator From Hell, Bastedo's sign, Bastedo, Walter < Prev | Next > basyle, basylous, bat, batata

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<chemistry> A positive or nonacid constituent of compound, either elementary, or, if compound, performing the functions of an element.

Origin: Gr. Base + wood. See -yl.

(01 Mar 1998)

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Pertaining to, or having the nature of, a basyle; electro-positive; basic; opposed to chlorous.

(01 Mar 1998)

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